Di Flatt's Blog


Credit Crunch – I count, you count, they count. But how much does any of it count for you?

 

Di FlattHello everyone!   I am back after a little break of just being too too busy.  Oh and before we start today I better again mention, This is my personal blog so always remember that these are my views and thoughts and not those of my charity. If I do say anything as ‘Epilepsy Action’ then I will make that loud and clear.  So here we go, back to me…

 

Well how was your Easter?  Mine was mixture of busy busy fun along with some much needed relaxation.  We went to the Billionaire Boys Club and Glamour & Excess Easter Bunny party at Oracle in Leeds.  This was great fun.  But let me just tell you there are some nights out where you really SHOULD NOT wear your four inch heels.  Starting parties at 9pm and dancing through till 3am does not make your feeties love you in the morning.  I know because mine were positively frowning at me for two days afterwards.  As you can all probably guess the relaxation came AFTER the party.

 

Thus for the next party (which is rapidly approaching) I shall be wearing pretty girlie pumps of no higher than two inches – I promise.  No really feeties I promise you!  I will never do that to you again.

 

Hmmnnnnnn.  Well some of you may be wondering how my fundraising is going!

 

Those of you who know me well will know of my inherent optimism and constant smiling…. well if there is one thing that can test my usual exuberance it is the

 

CREDIT CRUNCH

 

I know that all charities are working hard to maximise their resources – but there are certainly days right now when I groan a little.

 

Some people are cancelling their usual direct debit donations – and lets be fair who can blame them!

 

However I cannot help but wonder how many realise just how much the charity sector relies on their support.  Certainly for my charity over 90 percent of our income is from voluntary donation, or individuals’ participation in our many events.

 

So yes some days I groan a little.

 

However I groan not only for the charity but for the person who feels they have to stop their donation.  It really cannot be an easy moment.

 

Every single pound we choose to give to a charity is important.  Every generous gift we make is going towards helping someone, improving life chances, saving a life, improving the environment, and changing the world forever.

 

So – it certainly cannot be easy to stop your charity donations.  For all of us the credit crunch is making things hard.

 

But life was not meant to be just easy!  So perhaps we will all learn a lot at this time.  Or at the very least remember things we have maybe forgotten.

 

I for one have begun to remember just how much I like to be at home in my own kitchen and cook!

 

A couple of weeks ago I stayed with a friend who clearly also really enjoyed cooking for us both.

 

I have had groups of friends come round for the evening and we have eaten and drank together, watched DVDs, listened to music, played on the computer reading each other’s facebooks, updating our websites, and generally having just as much fun in my apartment as we would ordinarily have been having in the local pub or wine bar.

 

So perhaps, although hard, this is a time when we all remember how important it is to pull together, care about each other, and plough our more limited funds into the things that really matter to us.  The people and things we care about.

 

Please, everyone, do remember that the charities you support and care about continue to matter too – and they continue to matter to you.  If you can, don’t stop giving altogether.  Reduce it perhaps, or give in other ways: through participation in fun events for example, or even by writing the charity of your choice into your will.  Just don’t leave them behind forever – none of us know when we ourselves may need the support of a charity.

 

Actually writing this made me think of the charities that have supported my family.

 

Macmillan Cancer Support helped us through my dad’s cancer, staying with him and us until his final day.  So thank you so much Macmillan, we all needed you.

 

British Heart Foundation supported us when we lost our mum to heart attack.

 

I myself have worked in numerous charities.  I have worked with socially and economically deprived children – seeing things that opened my eyes to worlds and lives I could not otherwise have ever believed were taking place here in the UK.

 

I have work with terminally ill children and children living with life limiting conditions – they and their families need huge amounts of care and support, and I shall remember every one of them that I met that are no longer with us today.

 

Today of course I work for Epilepsy Action, a charity providing services and a voice for all people living with epilepsy in the UK, and their families.  I myself had epilepsy as a child and so understand the difficulties and issues that confront you when living with this condition, and thus why our services are so vital.

 

Every charity you will know of needs financial support to enable them to provide the help and services they are there to provide.

 

Every pound you donate supports making our world a better place, a better space for us all to share.

 

I have reduced my own donations to the charities I support, and when I can I will increase them again.

 

Yes, my charitable giving is on the edge of my budget – but it is a necessary expense and one that will remain on my budget because who knows what is around the corner.  For me, for my loved ones, or for any of us.

 

DON’T EVER FORGET THAT FROM ONE BLADE OF GRASS WE CAN GROW A LAWN

Every £1 donated to charity goes towards changing someone’s life or positively changing our environment. My charity www.epilepsy.org.uk, and every charity – we need you.

KEEP ON GIVING.  YOUR GIVING COUNTS!

Di x

 

 

 

 

 

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3 Comments so far
Leave a comment

Great blog, Di. I’m wondering if the number of £’s given bears any relation to the kind of publicity a charity is getting at any time. Personally, my £10/month to the RSPCA was stopped after some bad press, about prosecuting a Policeman who put a cat out of it’s misery after a road accident. Started me thinking about how my money is spent. What can you do?

Comment by Steve Carter

Hi Steve. One thing you can do is to undertake a little research into the work your chosen charity is doing. If you find a element of the work the charity is doing is of particular interest to you, then you can ask for your donation to be spent on that piece of work. Of course you would also need to stipulate that if that project was fully funded you are happy for it to be spent elsewhere as required.
Registered charities work to extremely strict constitutions and objectives, as well as being required to adhere to charitable law, fundraising standards board, and institute of fundraising codes of practice.
What I always suggest to people who ask is – remember that it is the beneficiary of your £1 that is in need of your support. In your case the cat. I feel sure that RSPCA would only consider prosecuting if they were positive a better solution could have been sought for the benefit of the animal concerned.
Never forget the power of the press – every story can be exagerated for maximum media effect!
Take care now.

Comment by diflatt

Hi, cool post. I have been wondering about this issue,so thanks for sharing. I’ll definitely be coming back to your posts. Keep up the good work

Comment by How I Was Able to Lose T h i r t y P o u n d s in Only a Month




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